Community Consultancy

I’m looking for a research intern to help me develop Mindapples and other Sociability projects, so I wanted to know where I should post the opportunity to attract a bright, enthusiastic graduate (if you know anyone, please let me know).

Rather than trawl the web looking for good sites and hunting out advice in forums and social enterprise communities, I twittered the question to see what my friends and contacts would suggest. Almost immediately, here’s what I got back:

tomstafford@gandy mindhacks.com could do you a shout out if you’d like

adamrothwell@gandy W4MP works really rather well for us, even though we’re not (err) an MP…

tomnixon@gandy Brighton and Sussex unis would both be v. happy to talk to you and help you find a graduate

noelitoRT @gandy looking for a bright, enthusiastic graduate to be my research intern on @Mindapples and other projects.

And because my Twitter is linked to my Facebook status too, I also got these responses through Facebook:

Aly Ripoarts jobs
Imran Khanw4mp?
Anthony McCannwww.jobs.ac.uk

Great stuff – thanks to everyone for providing such valuable advice and offering to help, you’ve solved my problem perfectly.

So what’s just happened there? It’s the sort of knowledge that isn’t quite worth paying a consultant for, but which is still incredibly important when building an organisation. Traditionally you might get it from peers, mentors and other people in similar situations; you could also get it from Yahoo Answers, LinkedIn Q&As or potentially School of Everything. But Twitter is simpler and quicker than talking offline, more personal than the normal online solutions and well-suited to the tiny drip-feed of questions that comes with running a business. It’s not a replacement for these other tools, or for mentoring, training or consultancy. It’s something new, or rather a scalable version of something old: a peergroup of fellow professional supporting each other.

I have around 500 followers, plus various overlapping Facebook friends – not many in the grand scheme of things but they’re generally quality people who know their stuff and with whom I have genuine relationships. They didn’t cost me anything to acquire except time in being friendly and creating valuable content, and now they provide me with free consultancy that is worth a huge amount to me and my projects. In return I help people out and the whole ‘economy’ seems healthy and mutually beneficial.

The point is, there’s far more to Twitter (and Facebook) than brand awareness and self-promotion. In engaging with a community of peers, I gain not just a media channel but an educational resource too. Much like a guild or professional association, Twitter allows me to build my own network of specialists with whom I share knowledge and swap industry insights. It allows me to build my own personal “guild” directed entirely to the skills and industries that interest me. They can teach me how to do my job better, whatever my job happens to be today.

So the next question is, how can you put a value on that? And the question after that is, why on earth isn’t your business on Twitter?

2 comments on “Community Consultancy

  1. Andy Gibson on said:

    I’ve also just tried the same thing for print-on-demand services, and got back:

    http://www.blurb.com (clear winner)
    http://www.lulu.com (popular but US shipping, not v green)
    http://www.completelynovel.com/ (new startup)
    http://www.lightningsource.com/ (mixed reviews)
    http://biddles.co.uk (untested)

    And publishers’ alternatives:
    http://www.authorhouse.co.uk/ http://www.authonomy.com/
    Waterstones in-house printing services

    And also:
    http://www.metamute.org/ (friends of friends doing Drupal pod stuff)
    http://www.issuu.com

    Thank you Twitter!